EXHIBITION PROGRAMME 2014

2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014

 

Artist: Mary Theresa Keown, Artist in Residence 2014

Title of Exhibition: 'The Cutting Rooms II'

Date: Friday 5th Sept - 25th Sept

Exhibition Images:

The Mimetic Room

Sourced from an array of images from magazines, Internet, TV, etc., these compositions are intersected with /expressive elements of paint; marks that let paint do what it wants. The compositions are highly edited in favour of those aesthetic notions of balance and colour and surface. In this way they belong to a post-production method, where editing becomes essential to the work.

Different qualities of image are hinged together in paint; they demonstrate that which the tradition of painting has tested in history. It’s capacity as a tool to mimic reality and that which it is simply described as- a substance over a surface.

Keown has twice exhibited in Japan, influencing Tokyo Ping. The desperate appropriation of random bits of Japanese punk culture is tied together by the traditional rising sun streaks emanating from the center of the canvases. In Sickert/Collings/Eruption a diptych that contains the paintings of Walter Sickert and Matthew Collings along with an obscured image of a volcanic eruption co-join three languages transforming the syntax of the work.

 

 

The Narrative Room

These paintings were borne by simplifying the language of the collage cast, strengthening the composition of characters and plots within them.

The collages are displayed in this exhibition also.
From the collages it is possible to perceive the editing process between collage and canvas.

This room echoes the invention of character and plot in cinema. The composition, tones and contrast of each painting is dictated by their parts.

 

The Diptych Room

Is a room of diptychs. Here the hyphenation of visual languages is distilled into two distinct canvases. The representational canvas has been carefully selected because of its compositional properties and art reference and surface.

Originally all these diptychs were hung sideways in an attempt to make the viewer see their abstract values, this however Keown re-considered. Notably though, the female figures are still featured on their sides.

The monotone canvases are influenced by the pure abstractionist of the New York School Fredrick Matys Thurz and are entirely grounded in the properties of paint. Monochrome painting as a genre is generally known as painting pure and simple, painting distilled to what is perceived as it’s essentials, its roots. In the European discourse concrete painting - painting stripped of depiction and illusion, abstract painting, painting not about the world but about painting, about it’s skins and it’s noise, here is communicating directly with image.

 

The Liquin Room

At this point Keown has abandoned the collage as a means to create images for her paintings.

These are paintings that are a product of layering and sanding. The images evolve from the syntactical marks and at some point are prescribed elements to encourage a sense of an image but stopped before they make exact sense.

The paintings, tending to be populated with figures, have evolved into historical visual languages mostly from Painting history. Their colour and form evoke nostalgic notes from art history and for the purposes of this exhibition they equate to the moment of becoming images, the moment when action and light hit the camera film.

The Post Mortem Room

Attempts to sum up the ambition of the previous motivations for making paintings, they ironically announce the succinct possibility and limitations of visual language by being the embodiment of it’s meaning

Big Lemon is a painting of a lemon in the shape of a lemon and is painted with lemon pigment. A notional sculptural palette consists of five canvases that contain dry pigment surfaces made and installed in the gallery. They question the permanence of the painted object, as these surfaces are open to being touched and changed forever. They sit upon a grey wall- the colour Modernism from the dulux range. Modernism’s association with the death of painting is also a considered element to this piece. Irish Painting references the punt five pence bull and the two pence celtic stork. This painting represents seven pence and is worth as much.

 

Attempts to sum up the ambition of the previous motivations for making paintings, they ironically announce the succinct possibility and limitations of visual language by being the embodiment of it’s meaning

Big Lemon is a painting of a lemon in the shape of a lemon and is painted with lemon pigment. A notional sculptural palette consists of five canvases that contain dry pigment surfaces made and installed in the gallery. They question the permanence of the painted object, as these surfaces are open to being touched and changed forever. They sit upon a grey wall- the colour Modernism from the dulux range. Modernism’s association with the death of painting is also a considered element to this piece. Irish Painting references the punt five pence bull and the two pence celtic stork. This painting represents seven pence and is worth as much.

About the Exhibition: In 1997 Mary Theresa Keown initiated 'The Cutting Rooms', an exhibition of paintings that experimented with the role of collage in painting. Such a process lended itself to the idea of crossbreeding languages and invited different motivations for editing, composition and surface treatment. 
Using the analogy of cinematic production to post-production Keown designed 'The Cutting Rooms II' in a more expansive way by displaying different bodies of more recent work in five separate rooms: the Mimetic room, the Diptych room, the Narrative room, the Liquin room and the Post-Mortem room. 
Each room expresses a different motivation that is concerned with the make-up of an image and the process of painting. The sequence of Keown's work begins with post-production methods and then examines diverse processes and production techniques ending with a summation of the state of painting, it's possibilities and limitations.

Biography: Mary Theresa Keown was born in Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland in 1974. She is a part-time lecturer at the University of Ulster teaching B.A. Fine Art, Painting, where she graduated in 1997. She has been exhibiting consistently internationally and nationally. In 2007 she had her second solo show in Tokyo, Japan and exhibits regularly in the Mullan Gallery, Belfast. She has won many awards including the Ireland Fund of Great Britain- artist of the year award in 2001 and her work is housed in many public and private collections. Mary currently lives in Glenfarne, Co.Leitrim and works part-time as administrator at the Leitrim Sculpture Centre, Manorhamilton.