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22/05/24 - 22/06/24

The research associated with this exhibition residency considers the implementation of modernism in design in the post WWII-era. This is a theme that has recurred in my practice most evident in the ongoing series Aggironamento (2016 -) where I considered the shift in architectural style within Ireland in the 1960’s, mostly in the arena of public buildings and infrastructure built by either the Catholic Church or the Office of Public Works (OPW). A central theme of this work is the incongruity of these structures to the surrounding environment and how surprising it is to come upon these structures in the Irish context.

Another thread to this research is the interaction between the built environment and the society that inhabits it. A particular focus for investigation is how the ideology of an era can be manifest in architectural design. The destruction of many cities in Europe during WWII generated the need for a rebuild. Parallel to this was the desire to create a new more ‘modern’ society. It seems evident that the desire to create a rupture with the past is somewhat connected to the societal trauma of the war. This utopian drift towards a hypermodernity is curious because in many instances it did not achieve the predicted societal renewal it presumed.

Central to my practice is the use of photography and photochemical darkroom processes. In this capacity, I usually capture the majority of my images using pre-digital cameras. Typically, the media I use has a relationship to the architectural period depicted, for example using Super 8 cinema film, launched in 1965 to document buildings of the same era. A current project in development during this residency looks at modernist architecture that has either been abandoned or failed in its intended purpose. To this end, I am currently editing and printing a series of new works that focus on architectural remnants of the mid-century that are now obsolescent.